Lessons on the Nazi invasion of Denmark takes Lehman-Jackson Elementary School students to the kitchen


By Eileen Godin - [email protected]



Lehman-Jackson Elementary School sixth-grade teacher Shelene James reviews the recipe for ‘Poor Knight’s Dessert’ with her class. The project gave students an idea of some of the flavors families were not able to have when the Nazi’s invaded Denmark.


Sixth-grade Lehman-Jackson Elementary School student, Kelley Zimmerman, right, strains the strawberry juice to be used in making of ‘Poor Knight’s Dessert’ in the school’s cafeteria kitchen March 4.


Twelve-year-old Kendall Decker, a student at Lehman-Jackson Elementary School, right, spreads melted butter on bread to make ‘Poor Knight’s Dessert’ while her classmate Claire Dougherty observes.



Recommended


    “Poor Knight’s Dessert” recipe,

    provided by Shelene James, sixth-grade teacher

    at Lehman-Jackson Elementary School.

    Ingredients:

    1 box of frozen strawberries

    8 slices of white bread

    1 cup of milk

    6 tablespoons of sugar

    1 1/2 teaspoons of cinnamon

    1 stick of butter

    Strawberry sauce:

    Put frozen strawberries in a strainer with a bowl underneath. Then, mash strawberries to remove seeds while collecting the juice in the bowl.

    Bread:

    Dry eight slices of bread by baking at 150 degrees for 15 minutes on each side or until dry but not brown.

    Then, melt butter in a microwave for about 45 seconds or until melted.

    Brush butter on the bottom of the pan before placing bread down. Place bread slices on the baking sheet and brush remaining butter onto the slices of bread.

    After the bread is buttered, combine cinnamon and sugar together.

    Pour milk evenly over the bread (about two tablespoons of milk on each slice of bread).

    Then, sprinkle cinnamon and sugar mixture evenly onto bread slices.

    Place baking sheet in an oven heated to 325 degrees for about 5-7 minutes or until the bread is evenly browned.

    Warm strawberry sauce in a microwave for about 30 seconds.

    Pour strawberry sauce over the bread.

    Serve and enjoy.

    By Eileen Godin

    [email protected]

    Lehman-Jackson Elementary School sixth-grade teacher Shelene James reviews the recipe for ‘Poor Knight’s Dessert’ with her class. The project gave students an idea of some of the flavors families were not able to have when the Nazi’s invaded Denmark.
    http://mydallaspost.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Lehman-Jackson-danish-1-1.jpgLehman-Jackson Elementary School sixth-grade teacher Shelene James reviews the recipe for ‘Poor Knight’s Dessert’ with her class. The project gave students an idea of some of the flavors families were not able to have when the Nazi’s invaded Denmark.

    Sixth-grade Lehman-Jackson Elementary School student, Kelley Zimmerman, right, strains the strawberry juice to be used in making of ‘Poor Knight’s Dessert’ in the school’s cafeteria kitchen March 4.
    http://mydallaspost.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Lehman-Jackson-danish-3-1.jpgSixth-grade Lehman-Jackson Elementary School student, Kelley Zimmerman, right, strains the strawberry juice to be used in making of ‘Poor Knight’s Dessert’ in the school’s cafeteria kitchen March 4.

    Twelve-year-old Kendall Decker, a student at Lehman-Jackson Elementary School, right, spreads melted butter on bread to make ‘Poor Knight’s Dessert’ while her classmate Claire Dougherty observes.
    http://mydallaspost.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Lehman-Jackson-danish-2-1.jpgTwelve-year-old Kendall Decker, a student at Lehman-Jackson Elementary School, right, spreads melted butter on bread to make ‘Poor Knight’s Dessert’ while her classmate Claire Dougherty observes.

    LEHMAN TWP. — A lesson about the Nazi invasion of Denmark provided an opportunity to incorporate a hands-on experience for students at Lehman-Jackson Elementary School March 4.

    Nineteen students in Shelene James’ sixth-grade class headed into the school’s cafeteria kitchen to make Arme Riddere, also known as “Poor Knight’s Dessert.” The pastry corresponds with a book the class read called “Number the Stars” by Lois Lowry.

    The dessert plays a small role in the story but represents how food rations restricted the public’s use of many common ingredients such as cream, butter, cinnamon and sugar during the Nazi invasion of Denmark in 1943, James said.

    Food rations made sweets such as cakes and cupcakes impossible to make, James said.

    “Making of ‘Poor Knight’s Dessert’ gave the students an idea of the flavors” unavailable at the time, James said.

    “It was neat how they (the book’s characters) pooled the goods together to make the dessert,” 11-year-old Adam Walp said.

    Wearing hair nets, aprons and plastic kitchen gloves the students formed an assembly line along a stainless steel table in the school’s cafeteria kitchen.

    The class was organized into small groups, and each was assigned a duty. Some students buttered two baking sheets while others prepared the sugar and cinnamon mixture, coated slices of bread with milk or mashed up strawberries in a strainer.

    Sixth-grade student Jessica DeAngelis, 12, was busy using her hands to squeeze the juice out of strawberries that were in a strainer with a bowl underneath.

    “It feels like I am smooshing my hands in Jello,” DeAngelis said.

    The recipe originally called for raspberries. “We all agreed to use strawberries instead,” James said.

    Once the slices of bread mixed with milk, cinnamon and sugar were prepared, James put them in the oven. The students switched gears and began to clean up their workspace.

    The scent of cinnamon in the air drew interest from school Principal Donald James.

    “It smells really good,” he said.

    When the oven timer bell rang, two baking sheets were removed from the oven. Students heated up the strawberry juice and carefully poured spoonfuls it over the bread.

    The teacher cut the bread slices in half and carried the trays out to the students.

    “Poor Knight’s Dessert” received a big thumbs up from all the students.

    “It tastes like French toast,” Brady Newman, 12, said.

    “I didn’t think it would taste good because of the milk and cinnamon,” 12-year-old Kendall Decker said. “But it is really good. I could definitely make this at home.”

    “Poor Knight’s Dessert” recipe,

    provided by Shelene James, sixth-grade teacher

    at Lehman-Jackson Elementary School.

    Ingredients:

    1 box of frozen strawberries

    8 slices of white bread

    1 cup of milk

    6 tablespoons of sugar

    1 1/2 teaspoons of cinnamon

    1 stick of butter

    Strawberry sauce:

    Put frozen strawberries in a strainer with a bowl underneath. Then, mash strawberries to remove seeds while collecting the juice in the bowl.

    Bread:

    Dry eight slices of bread by baking at 150 degrees for 15 minutes on each side or until dry but not brown.

    Then, melt butter in a microwave for about 45 seconds or until melted.

    Brush butter on the bottom of the pan before placing bread down. Place bread slices on the baking sheet and brush remaining butter onto the slices of bread.

    After the bread is buttered, combine cinnamon and sugar together.

    Pour milk evenly over the bread (about two tablespoons of milk on each slice of bread).

    Then, sprinkle cinnamon and sugar mixture evenly onto bread slices.

    Place baking sheet in an oven heated to 325 degrees for about 5-7 minutes or until the bread is evenly browned.

    Warm strawberry sauce in a microwave for about 30 seconds.

    Pour strawberry sauce over the bread.

    Serve and enjoy.

    Reach Eileen Godin at 570-991-6387 or on Twitter @TLNews.

    Reach Eileen Godin at 570-991-6387 or on Twitter @TLNews.

    comments powered by Disqus