Dallas Lions Club’s Hometown Heroes banners returned to family members


Hometown Heroes banners returned to family members

Staff reports



State Sen. Lisa Baker, R-Lehman Township, holds a banner of her father Edward Jones who was a World War II veteran. Although he was a Quaker, he put aside his religious beliefs to serve his country.


Joseph Canfield, Dallas, holds up a banner of himself as a young man serving the country in Korea. Canfield is also a member of the Dallas Lions Club, which started the Hometown Heroes banner project in 2011. The project is being suspended at least until the roundabout construction in the center of Dallas is completed.


The Ides, of the Back Mountain, contributed at least two veterans to the Hometown Heroes banner project. The project is being suspended until the roundabout is completed in Dallas and may be reinstated on a smaller scale afterwards.


Members of the Dallas Senior High School Military Interest Club present colors during a ceremony by the Dallas Lion Club in which commemorative service banners are returned to family members. The banners have been hanging on utility poles around Dallas for the last five years and need to be taken down for the roundabout construction to be completed. The banner project may be reinstated after construction is complete.


Members of the Dallas Lions Club applaud during a ceremony during which the club returned commemorative service banners to family members. The banners have been hanging on utility poles around Dallas for the last five years and need to be taken down for the roundabout construction project in the center of Dallas. The banner project may be reinstated after the construction is completed on a lesser scale.



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    Hometown Heroes banners returned to family members

    Staff reports

    State Sen. Lisa Baker, R-Lehman Township, holds a banner of her father Edward Jones who was a World War II veteran. Although he was a Quaker, he put aside his religious beliefs to serve his country.
    http://mydallaspost.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_DP-06052016-heroes-banners-1.jpgState Sen. Lisa Baker, R-Lehman Township, holds a banner of her father Edward Jones who was a World War II veteran. Although he was a Quaker, he put aside his religious beliefs to serve his country.

    Joseph Canfield, Dallas, holds up a banner of himself as a young man serving the country in Korea. Canfield is also a member of the Dallas Lions Club, which started the Hometown Heroes banner project in 2011. The project is being suspended at least until the roundabout construction in the center of Dallas is completed.
    http://mydallaspost.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_DP-06052016-heroes-banners-2.jpgJoseph Canfield, Dallas, holds up a banner of himself as a young man serving the country in Korea. Canfield is also a member of the Dallas Lions Club, which started the Hometown Heroes banner project in 2011. The project is being suspended at least until the roundabout construction in the center of Dallas is completed.

    The Ides, of the Back Mountain, contributed at least two veterans to the Hometown Heroes banner project. The project is being suspended until the roundabout is completed in Dallas and may be reinstated on a smaller scale afterwards.
    http://mydallaspost.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_DP-06052016-heroes-banners-3.jpgThe Ides, of the Back Mountain, contributed at least two veterans to the Hometown Heroes banner project. The project is being suspended until the roundabout is completed in Dallas and may be reinstated on a smaller scale afterwards.

    Members of the Dallas Senior High School Military Interest Club present colors during a ceremony by the Dallas Lion Club in which commemorative service banners are returned to family members. The banners have been hanging on utility poles around Dallas for the last five years and need to be taken down for the roundabout construction to be completed. The banner project may be reinstated after construction is complete.
    http://mydallaspost.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_DP-06052016-heroes-banners-4.jpgMembers of the Dallas Senior High School Military Interest Club present colors during a ceremony by the Dallas Lion Club in which commemorative service banners are returned to family members. The banners have been hanging on utility poles around Dallas for the last five years and need to be taken down for the roundabout construction to be completed. The banner project may be reinstated after construction is complete.

    Members of the Dallas Lions Club applaud during a ceremony during which the club returned commemorative service banners to family members. The banners have been hanging on utility poles around Dallas for the last five years and need to be taken down for the roundabout construction project in the center of Dallas. The banner project may be reinstated after the construction is completed on a lesser scale.
    http://mydallaspost.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_DP-06052016-heroes-banners-5.jpgMembers of the Dallas Lions Club applaud during a ceremony during which the club returned commemorative service banners to family members. The banners have been hanging on utility poles around Dallas for the last five years and need to be taken down for the roundabout construction project in the center of Dallas. The banner project may be reinstated after the construction is completed on a lesser scale.

    DALLAS TWP. — Friends and family of active, retired and deceased military personnel gathered Saturday, May 28 at Dallas High School to collect banners of their loved ones from the Dallas Lions Club’s Hometown Heroes project.

    The project, which has been featured throughout Dallas Borough for the past five years, has been discontinued due to PennDOT’s roundabout construction project, set to begin this year in the center of the borough.

    Club members said they may pursue a similar project in the future.

    The Dallas High School Military Interest Club also participated in the event.

    Reach the Dallas Post newsroom at 570-675-5211 or by email at [email protected]

    Reach the Dallas Post newsroom at 570-675-5211 or by email at [email protected]

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